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Culture of Reverence Over Children's Safety



Culture of Reverence Led to ‘Total Disregard’ for Children’s Safety



          With reference to the criminal findings of a 267-page report, Brad Wolverton writes about how the most powerful leaders at Pennsylvania State University continually covered up the child sexual abuse cases related to Mr. Jerry Sandusky – Penn State’s football coach – over a span of fourteen years.  He stated that Pennsylvania State University’s leaders showed a “total disregard” for the safety and “welfare of children” (p. 7).
In respect to sociology, how could a community so large, with various top influential leaders, deny the safety of even one child, let alone 52 counts of sexual abuse that Jerry Sandusky was convicted for?  In reading the article, it showed that various officials placed blame on other various individuals, repeatedly tossing the hot potato denying the allegations; of course until there was blatant evidence, and they could no longer deny the truth.  Does this hideous crime have to do with the various statuses and classes of society – the vulnerable, small child who works hard, usually for little money, to be noticed and the powerful and influential leaders ridden with importance, honor, and affluence?  The correctly taught child’s role is to listen to his elders and do what they ask or live in fear of being kicked off of the football team and perhaps even disappointing his parents.  So, instead, the child submits and continues to obey without voice.  This is an ideology that represents a system of domination, authority, and power that has been abused to the furthest extent.  The corporate university’s role is to educate.  However, in this particular case the corporate goal of the university was to maintain structure, keep-face with the public, and continue to promote athleticism of their team disregarding the child’s safety and welfare. 
Ultimately, the game of football was more important than the children’s safety and well-being.  In the end, Pennsylvania State’s top officials shared a pattern of beliefs, norms, and values such as selfishness, domination, and the lack of a child’s worth.  Still, in today’s society this culture is strongly noted.  This traditional authority continues to repeat itself, not only in corporations such as Penn State, but in the smaller structured systems called family.      

Reference
Penn State’s Culture of Reverence Led to ‘Total Disregard’ for Children’s Safety. (2012, July
12). The Chronicles of Higher Education. Retrieved November 05, 2012, from http://chronicle.com/article/Penn-States-Culture-of/132853/





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